International Clinical Trials Day 19th May 2015

  Tuesday the 19th of May marked our celebration of International Clinical Trials Day. This annual event commemorates the beginning of clinical research, dating back to the 18th century when James Lind studied Scurvy, developing the theory that citrus fruits … Continued

Mapping the unborn baby’s brain to better combat disease

Thanks to state-of-the-art technology, doctors at King’s College London are mapping the brains of babies while they are still in the womb. Traditional MRI scanners work by taking a series of cross-sectional images that are then are reconstructed into 3D … Continued

dHCP Launch Event

Launch of iFIND and Connectome On 3rd February over 50 people gathered in the Central Hall at St Thomas’ Hospital for the launch of the new fetal imaging studies iFIND (intelligent Fetal Imaging and Diagnosis) and the Developing Human Connectome … Continued

Mapping Autism in the Developing Brain

“Researchers in London plan to examine the brains of living fetuses in order to understand how the brain organizes itself during critical stages of its development. The hope is that a dynamic map of the connections forming in the unborn’s … Continued

MRI Brain Development Study in the Spotlight

“A project led by King’s College London that uses state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies to map brain connections in babies before and just after birth, has been featured in the Physics World Focus on Medical Imaging, published in December 2013. In … Continued

What goes on in babies’ brains?

“Some 85 billion neurones and upwards of 100 trillion connections – the adult human brain is the most complex object in the known universe. But how does such a rich neural network grow from a tiny foetus? And how does that growth affect the way our … Continued

Advancing MRI Scans for Foetal Development

“Mapping the development of babies while they are still in the womb is the premise of a European project which aims to design techniques designed to pinpoint problems earlier, and develop appropriate therapies. The dHCP (‘Developing Human Connectome Project’) project … Continued